Adam Carroll


Two tied-dyed brain fried misfits who lived in a shack in the back of the bodark Woods
A Caddo guy and a Crockett girl worked hard at staying stoned as best they could
Coming up in the night they were high as a Christmas moon
Coming down was the fear in the four walls of their room
They were two hardcore junkies and they stayed drunker than a bunch of monkeys
There were barrels of laughter with no time left to lose
They had nightmares and needles, with the Stones and the Beatles
they kept all the straight laced businessmen confused
and the days went by with the red bandana blues

Well ivy was grown o’r their heavenly homes
And their only companions were the chickens and the doves
When the law had em’ made they got laid in the shade
And their face was the grace from the good lord up above
Making love in the woods was peaceful most of the time
The revolution was the last thing on their minds
They were tough, foul mouthed and lazy, they ate biscuits and gravy
They wore blue bell-bottomed jeans and platform shoes
They slapped at the insects, while they laughed at the rednecks
They kept all the straight laced businessmen confused
And the days went by with the red bandana blues, all right
They wore black suspenders on all day benders
And the world was changing and the kids were running wild
They got grey hairs sat in rocking chairs
And built a great big cradle for a new born flower child
And they never grew up and they never moved to town
But they kind of faded away when the Bodarks got cut down
They had bad luck and good times, cold beer and pork rinds
And the Sunday funnies were the only worthy news
They had nightmares and needles, with the Stones and the Beatles
They kept all the straight laced businessmen confused
Yeah, they were low down and worthless but they were nice on the surface
They got by just fine on whatever they could use
And in trouble they got deeper as they grew their crops of reefer
Because business and pleasure were two words they got confused
And the days went by with the red bandana blues, hey